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To start our new feature we have turned to a classic Hitchcock starring Cary Grant – North by Northwest.   

 The film was made in 1959 and is considered one of Hitchcock’s finest films.    

Considering the company, (Psycho, Rear Window, Rebecca to name a few of my favourites) that should make it a pretty fine film. 

 
 Added to this is the presence in the starring role of the “second greatest male star of all time”*, Cary Grant.  

The film opens showing the busy streets of New York, commuters going through subway entrances and Grand Central Station.  Beautiful shots of a vintage New York filled with beautifully dressed New Yorkers.  The opening ends with the inevitable cameo from Hitchcock, as he tries to get on a New York bus but is denied access, as the doors close.   

 We then meet Roger Thornhill, played by Grant, who is an advertising executive in The Big Apple. He is walking along the street ,talking to his secretary, en route to a hotel to meet friends for drinks.  Dapper and dashing, Grant immediately is central to the film.  And his voice…

The central premise of the film happens immediately.  Thornhill meets with his friends and realises that he has asked his secretary to do something impossible so calls the telegram boy over to assist him to make contact with her.  Just prior to this the telegram boy had been calling for a Kaplan, who he has a telegram for.  Thornhill, calling him over at this point, causes two “heavies”, waiting in the vicinity to see who Kaplan is, to believe that Thornhill is Kaplan.  They therefore kidnap him at gunpoint and escort him to a large house.  His protestations as to his identify are laughed at and he has bourbon poured down his throat to get him drunk so that the “heavies” can fake his death by causing him to drive off of a cliff.  

Thornhill somehow manages to drive the car only ending his journey when he avoids colliding with a cyclist and finds himself rear-ended by the patrol car that is following him.  He is detained by police officers and taken to the station where he is charged with drink driving.  His appearance at court finds his defence attorney advising the court that he was kidnapped and force fed bourbon.  No-one believes him.  

The film then continues as Roger Thornhill strives to clear his name.

I won’t give away any more.  I want you to watch it!  There are some classic scenes.  The crop duster plane scene and the closing scenes around Mount Rushmore are action packed and well shot.  There is a murder, there’s a love interest (who’s got great hair!).

  

  
I’m sure many of you have seen great classic films and there are many classic films that feature as our favourites.  But for me I kind of take what is in front of me.  So my favourite films are the ones that I grew up with and I watch what is newly released or on the shelves in Tesco!  So the idea of this feature in my blog is to explore some classics.  I’ve started in my comfort zone because I have to admit in the last year I have sought out Hitchcock films.  My name is Rebecca so one of my favourite books is Daphne Du Maurier’s Rebecca, which I collect copies of.

  
I love Hitchcock’s Rebecca which is so true to the book.  So I’ve continued trying them out.  I’ll make sure that we watch Rear Window as part of the blog because the vintage clothing in that film is to die for!  And it stars Grace Kelly and James Stewart. What’s not to like!!!!

   
   
So let me know if you have seen North by Northwest.  Have a look out for it if you haven’t.  I highly recommend it.  And come back next week to catch our review of “The Day The Earth Caught Fire”.  This film is a recommendation and one we have yet to see.  So we’re excited about starting this journey.  

  
And the verdict on North by Northwest.  A WV favourite.  Full of vintage clothing, hairstyles, coats and hats.  A great story directed by the master director.  Action packed from start to finish.  And did I forget to mention James Mason!

Enjoy, love Wish Vintage xx

*Named as such by the America Film Institute in 1999 after Humphrey Bogart